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The definition of Bacon’s rebellion in US history can be articulated as a led by Nathaniel Bacon uprising of Virginia frontiersmen against the colonial government, which took place in 1676-1677. Even though it failed to be successful for the rebels, the event implied some significance for the nation.

Explanation:

To begin with, one should comment on the reasons for the uprising. On the one hand, the unrest emerged because Governor William Berkeley was inactive in response to numerous Native American attacks on the frontier population. Thus, the government’s inability to provide safety to American citizens led to the uprising.

On the other hand, Bacon’s rebellion causes included personal motives. It refers to the fact that Bacon and Berkeley were the members of the court, and they often had opposite opinions concerning some issues. Consequently, the two men had different supporters, and these groups clashed during the rebellion.

The culmination of the uprising occurred when the rebels came to Jamestown, the colonial capital, and burned it. Berkeley did not have sufficient resources to fight against the strikers, which made him retreat. However, the uprising was soon suppressed by the forces that arrived from England.

The effects of Bacon’s rebellion were not favorable for the rioters. Late 1976 witnessed as Bacon died from dysentery, and it happened shortly before the English forces arrived. When Governor Berkeley returned to power, he seized the property of a few rebels and even hanged a few of them.

However, the significance of Bacon’s rebellion became evident in a few years. It was the first uprising in American colonies, which united people of different classes and races. Many tend to believe that the rebellion was the first step towards the American Revolution that occurred 100 years later.