A

Schism of 1054, also called the East-West Schism, is the final separation of Eastern Christian church and Western church. It led to the creation of the two most substantial ramifications of Christianity, such as the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox.

Explanation:

Schism of 1054 is known as the Great Schism because it led to the split in Christianity. It is critical to note that that Schism did not occur at one moment, but was instead a long-lasting process that had various causes formed throughout a long period before 1054. The reasons for the East-West Schism had religious, social, and political roots. One of the conflicts was whether the pope had power over the patriarchs who were the church leaders in the east. One more reason that also led to the Great Schism was the breakup of the Roman Empire into the Western and Eastern (the Byzantine Empire) parts. There was also a conflict about the Balkans territory because both churches believed that the area belongs to them. Another reason for the two parts getting departed was the language barrier because most of the West population spoke Latin, while most of the East community spoke Greek.

Consequently, the churches at each of the Roman Empires started to hold different views on religious activities and other aspects. The tension between Constantinople church and Rome church escalated, and there was an exchange of the letters between the Patriarch of Constantinople and Pope Leo IX. The results of the conflict became the excommunication of the Patriarch of Constantinople, Michael Cerularius, from the Christian church in Rome on July 16, 1054. Throughout history, all of the attempts for reconciliation have failed, and Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches remain separate today, which implies the significance of the split in history.