Living In the Dorm – Not So Good After All, Part 3

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The experience of living in a dorm can be broadening and help a student mature. It can also expose a student to influences and risks that can derail a whole college career.
 
For some students, especially those from cultures where behavior is prescribed and proscribed, the presence of others engaging in actions that go against everything that they have been taught is quite disturbing. Parents, too, may be uncomfortable with the atmosphere in a dormitory, especially if they visit on a weekend.
 
Let us be honest. Co-ed dorms make sexual activity exceedingly easy. Despite the sort of incest taboo that tends to develop, whereby one’s own dorm-mates are off limits because they are in some sense like sisters and brothers, sex is happening all over the place. Even if you have decided to hew to a policy of celibacy and abstinence, you cannot stop your room-mate, or the kids next door, from engaging in whatever activities they choose to.
 
At the very least, you are going to see members of the opposite gender in a state dishabille. Maybe even more undressed than that. You are going to hear things as well.
 
This can be very embarrassing. It can be distressing. It is certainly distracting. For some, it is disgusting and makes relations among room-mates and dorm-mates very strained and difficult. Consider two women from Puerto Rico, educated in convent schools, who found themselves housed with two very different women, one a big city girl from a prep school, the other from a small public school in a very rural community.
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Living In the Dorm – Not So Good After All, Part 2

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We're back with part 2! Still thinking of living in the dorm? Be sure to read this article first!
 
Dormitory life can be fun, but it is also wearing, and often inconvenient and uncomfortable. While the comradeship and companionship of living together is wonderful, and the friendships thus formed can literally last a lifetime, the rigors of sharing such limited resources can be a serious distraction. After all, the main reason to be at college is to learn.
 
If you are miserable, you will not be able to study and do well in your classes, and that is not at all what your family has intended for you. We discussed some distractions of dorm residence in an earlier article. Let’s see what sorts of dis-commodious miseries the dormitory has in store for prospective occupants.
 
Everything in a dorm is shared. This means EVERYTHING. Your toilet seat, the sink surround, the counter, the toilet paper roll, the door of the stall, the shower floor, and all the surfaces; all used by as many people as are in your dorm.
 
Once upon a time, when dorms were universally single-sex, one could count on only ladies or only gentlemen using the facilities. Now, with coed dorms, there is often some sort of arrangement that switches boys and girls bathrooms depending on the hour, the day, the week, or some other criterion. Thus, you may be using a bathroom that was just previously used by the other gender.
 
This has terrors for both sexes. Men tend to spray when using the toilet. They have lots more body hair to clog up the shower drain. Their shaving can leave little bits around the sink in a black scum of soap and hair particles. They smell stronger, for the most part.
 
Women, on the other hand, often shave many more areas of the body, and that hair tends to be even stronger than beard hair. Women’s hair is often longer (although this certainly depends!) and when it clogs up the drain, it can cause a major hairball. There are times when the disposal of certain female products can also clog up even the best functioning toilets, and if a dormitory toilet is over-taxed, the extra load will be its downfall. Although men tend to smell sweaty, women can hold their own in the odor-production department, especially when pheremonal interaction entrains all of them into a common monthly cycle, a phenomenon known for millennia, but now termed the Mclintock Effect.
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Living In the Dorm – Not So Good After All, Part 1

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Are you ready for the dorm? Read on to find out!
 
Dormitory life is not necessarily the best setting for serious study. There are potential factors of noise, distraction, and personal discomfort that can make living on campus less conducive to academic achievement.
 
While in some areas, off-campus life is going to be more expensive, it may be a worthwhile investment if it means that you are getting better grades and finishing on time. We will talk about some of the more obvious problems and some that may not be so straightforward as well.
 
This may sound odd, but dormitories are a lot less studious than they were in our parents’ day. The past several decades have witnessed the transformation of the dorm from a single-sex enclave with a house-mother or house-parents, lights-out and quiet time rules, and one phone in the hallway, to something quite different. We now take for granted co-ed housing, with sources of noise and disruption on every hand. Consider the stereo equipment powerful enough to damage ear-drums, booming from many students’ rooms. Listen to the sound of cell phones in every pocket as well as, frequently, ringing land lines.
 
There are now televisions in many rooms, and computers or hand held devices that beep, ding, talk, play movies and amplify video games with vivid and gruesome sound effects, or alternatively, profoundly irritating voices such as in Angry Birds. The result? The dorm can be a fairly noisy spot during the hours when you want to study. The library or a lounge in another building may be your only refuge from such noise. Continue reading >

Web Review: Myngle.com

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Myngle logotype A foreign language is an important asset in anybody’s life. Whether you want to travel somewhere exotic, backpack through Europe, for example, or perhaps you hold an important position in a company with global reach and would need to relocate abroad in order to move ahead in the organization, knowing additional languages can be vital.
 
Perhaps, on the other hand, you just want to learn a cool foreign language, like French or Portuguese, in order to appreciate a whole new world of poetry or literature. Continue reading >